U.S Women’s Soccer team files gender discrimination lawsuit against own federation

U.S Women’s Soccer team files gender discrimination lawsuit against own federation

Over two dozen members of the U.S Women’s Football team have filed a lawsuit against their own federation, U.S Soccer  for “institutionalised gender discrimination”.

The lawsuit is an ongoing battle with the country’s federation over pay equity and working conditions, with players such as Alex Morgan, Carli Lloyd and Megan Rapinoe seeking back pay and damages for any female player who has represented the United States at senior level since 2015.

The current world champions reported the legal filing on Friday 8th March – International Women’s Day, and also 3 months before they go to defend their FIFA Women’s World Cup title in France.

Despite the women’s team’s success and popularity, they are still paid significantly less by U.S Soccer than the men’s team. The suit cites that if both the men's and women's teams played twenty friendlies per year, male players would earn $260,320 to the female players' $99,000.

The female athletes have claimed that gender discrimination has existed for many years and are now taking action as the most successful women’s football team in history to pave the way for other teams and the future of the sport. Co-captain Rapinoe told NBC News “I think a lot of people look to us and our team and the collective voice that we have and what we've stood for, for inspiration and for power, and as an ally in this broader fight for equality and human rights, really."

The full legal complaint can be found here.